Viral video: Subscribers

YouTube gives you a lot of different kinds of ways to relate to viewers and other YouTube users. You can be friends, subscribe, or just view. When you subscribe to a channel, that channel’s videos show up in a “feed” along with other channels you subscribe to. It’s almost like having your own TV channel programmed to see exactly what you want to see.

So it’s probably good for a channel to have subscribers, right? Random viewers may only watch one of your videos, once. But if someone subscribes to your channel, they might watch more of your videos over time. (Provided people actually view their subscriber feed, which isn’t guaranteed.)

Let’s test this hypothesis. The Media Show’s subscribers went from 100 in January of 2010 to 222 in May of 2010. Take a look at the graphs below. Does it look like the rise in subscribers led to a rise in the basic number of views each time a new video was posted? If there was a rise, how can you tell that subscribers made a difference? Develop alternate hypotheses: What else could be causing a rise in viewers over this time?

Here is a chart of all the views The Media Show's videos got between November 2009 and June 2010, with the sources showing how viewers got to our pages.

Here is a chart of all the views The Media Show's videos got between November 2009 and June 2010, with the sources showing how viewers got to our pages.

Here is a chart of the views The Media Show's videos got between November 2009 and June 2010, showing selected sources from which viewers got to our pages. These sources have been selected to show viewers who were less likely to have found us through external sources like embedded players or external links.

Here is a chart of the views The Media Show's videos got between November 2009 and June 2010, showing selected sources from which viewers got to our pages. These sources have been selected to show viewers who were less likely to have found us through external sources like embedded players or external links.